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Giving Second Chances: The Computer Applications Vocational Course

Tallaoen Elementary School Students trying out the computers
Tallaoen Elementary School Students trying out the computers

When HBI delivered and installed the 18 computers for the Tallaoen Vocational School’s Computer Application Course, everybody – teachers, students, community children, and the students of the Computer Applications vocational course were excited and ecstatic. One vocational school student said that “Now it’s real. A few months ago, we were just talking about class schedules, class attires, class lessons, and now that the computers and the printers are here, the vocational course has become more real.

 

The Computer Applications Course was geared towards piquing the interest of the Tallaoen community’s out-of-school youths and young parents. Targeting community members between the ages of 14 to 25 who dropped out of high school, the computer course’s curriculum was jointly created by HBI, the vocational school teacher – Mr. Enrico Sumera, and the vocational school students. Capitalizing on the fact that computers remain popular with younger people, HBI made sure that the sturdiest and advanced computers were provided to the project. The computers should be able to withstand daily use by computer newbies and should also be fast enough to cope with the various programs to be used in the course – Microsoft Office, Adobe InDesign, Photoshop, a third-party video editing software, and Internet software. In total, 36 out-of-school youths are the students of the course.

 

HBI meets with some of the Tallaoen Computer Applications Vocational School students
HBI meets with some of the Tallaoen Computer Applications Vocational School students, including Brenda Castillo

One of the vocational course students is Brenda Castillo, 23 years old. Like most Tallaoen girls, Brenda only managed to finish elementary school. “The Tallaoen Elementary School was quite near to our house, so finishing elementary school was not a problem. I was even one of the best students in my graduating class. The real problem emerged when I got into high school. It wasn’t the lessons – they were challenging, but I coped by reviewing my notes. The problem was the distance and the expenses.

 

According to the computer vocational course students, the tricycle fare from the community to the nearest high school, the newly-created Bungro-Sucoc Integrated School is at 50 pesos per person. Walking to the school would take more than an hour and though that seems like a good alternative to commuting, the children and the parents said that children often get soaked in the rain, their shoes, uniforms, and meager school supplies also get damaged. At the end of it all, no matter how hard the children and the parents try, a family’s income from farming is not enough to cover all the children’s education expenses.

 

The Tallaoen Vocational School students of the Computer Applications Course
The Tallaoen Vocational School students of the Computer Applications Course

Tallaoen residents like Brenda are then left with only two things to do after dropping out of high school – “help in the farm and get married”. In Brenda’s case, she helped in the farm first then got married. “I got married at 17, almost 18.” She says that her husband is a good person who works hard and loves their children. But when she heard about the Vocational School Project in Tallaoen Elementary School, she said that she was intrigued at first. “I’ve always liked schooling so I thought maybe I can give it a try. I asked my husband if I can join the classes and he was alright with it, so I signed up for the classes.

 

The decision to be part of the Computer Applications Vocational Course proved to be a wise and good one for Brenda. According to her course teacher, Sir Enrico Sumera, “Brenda is doing alright in class. She has basic knowledge of computers but she lacks experience in using computers. So in the first few lessons, she had numerous typos and difficulties with lessons. Now though, she continues to learn and I think she has the will and the smarts to be good at computers.

 

Brenda, along with her classmates, continues to go to school. “We actually have a big exam coming up so we’re usually reviewing past lessons.” With graduation looming, Brenda said she has plans of working as a computer encoder. “I hope I get a job related to the skills I’ve been learning these past few months. But whatever happens, I will not squander this second chance at an education that HBI and CO-OPERAID gave us.

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